Category: Science

Halloween 2013: Top Costumes, History, Myths, More

Halloween 2013: Top Costumes, History, Myths, More

| November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

A coven of costumed “witches” stripe up for a Halloween portrait on every side of 1910. Photograph by Transcendental Graphics, Getty Images Halloween 2013 should exist less scary in the United States than latest year’s holiday, when the wonderful Hurricane Sandy savaged parts of the U.S. Northeast. Despite the tear, 2012 featured record participation and [...]

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World’s Biggest Hornet Kills

World’s Biggest Hornet Kills

| November 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

The hercules hornet is native to East and Southeast Asia. Photograph through . Alastair Macewen, Oxford Scientific/Getty Images The nature’s biggest hornet is wreaking desolation in northwestern China, where 42 humbler classes have died after being swarmed and stung in Shaanxi Province, according to the Chinese tidings agency Xinhua. Some 1,600 others be under the necessity [...]

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New Possibilities for Graphene in Thin-Film Photovoltaics

New Possibilities for Graphene in Thin-Film Photovoltaics

| November 2, 2013 | 0 Comments

Graphene was deposited onto a glass substrate. The ultrathin bed. is but one atomic layer foggy (0.3 Angstrm, or 0.03 nanometers), although charge carriers are able to persuade about freely within this layer. This property is retained level if the graphene layer is covered through amorphous or polycrystalline silicon. Figure: Marc A. Gluba/HZBSource featured

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Much Earlier Split for Neanderthals, Humans?

Much Earlier Split for Neanderthals, Humans?

| November 1, 2013 | 0 Comments

A skull of a Homo neanderthalensis (left) and a present female Homo sapiens (right). Photographs through . David Liitschwager, National Geographic In the ranks of prehistoric humans, Neanderthals were our closest relatives. We were to such a degree close, in fact, that our assemblage interbred with theirs. Tracing back our lineages, in that place must [...]

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Gold-Plated Nanoparticles Seek and Destroy Cancer Cells

Gold-Plated Nanoparticles Seek and Destroy Cancer Cells

| October 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

In a newly published study, researchers from Cornell University narrative how they developed gold-plated nanoparticles that are efficient to find and destroy cancer cells. Comparable to nano-ascend Navy Seals, Cornell scientists have merged dwarfish gold and iron oxide particles to drudge as a team, then added antibody guides to steer the team through the bloodstream [...]

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Einstein’s Corpus Callosum Reveals Clues to His Brilliance

Einstein’s Corpus Callosum Reveals Clues to His Brilliance

| October 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

A newly published study takes a closer look at the “inside” of Einstein’s brain, revealing that the unusually well akin right and left hemispheres of his brain may esteem contributed to his intelligence. The left and just hemispheres of Albert Einstein’s brain were unusually well associated to each other and may be favored with contributed [...]

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I Ran Faster Because of My “Sports Gene”

I Ran Faster Because of My “Sports Gene”

| October 29, 2013 | 0 Comments

Finnish skier Eero Mantyranta at the IX Winter Olympics in Austria, 1964 Photograph by ITAR-TASS Photo Agency / Alamy Back then Eero Mntyranta was the greatest endurance athlete in the world, there was thing of no importance remarkable about his physical appearance. Sure, in pictures I had collected of him from the 1960s, his superficially [...]

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Hot Flashes in Cold Waters? Killer Whales Undergo Menopause

Hot Flashes in Cold Waters? Killer Whales Undergo Menopause

| October 28, 2013 | 0 Comments

Researchers make no doubt of that killer whales, like this any, undergo menopause. Photograph by Ralph Lee Hopkins, National Geographic Killer whales get been revealed to be one of merely three species whose females are known to bear menopause—living on long after their reproductive years in society to help their offspring, particularly their sons, survive [...]

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First-Ever Submarine Dive on Vancouver’s “Living Fossils”: Glass Sponge Reefs

First-Ever Submarine Dive on Vancouver’s “Living Fossils”: Glass Sponge Reefs

| October 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

A submersible make into Howe Sound in British Columbia reveals a colony of glass sponges. Photograph by Bruce Kirkby Howe Sound, British Columbia—Through the submersible’s acrylic viewport, a comprehensive patch of glass sponges looms up from the seafloor of Howe Sound (chart), a network of fjords located forward Vancouver’s doorstep. The sponges be warm creamy [...]

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Graphene Nanoribbons Improve Compressed Gas Storage

Graphene Nanoribbons Improve Compressed Gas Storage

| October 26, 2013 | 0 Comments

A compounded material created at Rice University is penuriously impervious to gas and may induce to efficient storage of compressed affectionate gas for vehicles. A 65-micrometer-large polymer film, photographed edge-on with an electron microscope, contains a small amount of enhanced graphene nanoribbons that immediate gas molecules a “tortuous path” to flee from. Credit: Changsheng Xiang/Rice [...]

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